Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Pistons Asset Board

Asset Board Explained

The "Value" metric is a function of (almost) everything that makes a player valuable to the organization.  Younger players are generally more valuable than veterans, in that they still hopefully have some potential to unlock; they are also generally cheaper.  Players on team-friendly contracts also receive favor when it comes time to assess a player's value.  Spencer Dinwiddie isn't a better player than a few of the guys he's in front of.  However, he's only 21 years old and making $700,000.  A similar consideration is made with regard to length of contract.  A good player under contract for two more years has more value than a good player whose deal is expiring at the end of the season.  At the other end of the spectrum, if you have two players who are "equally bad", the one with a shorter contract holds more value.

Draft picks due to be made in the upcoming draft are also on the board.  It might be fair to assess the value of future picks, as they are often traded, but due to the speculative nature involved with not knowing where the pick will be, it would be hard to assess a value for these picks.  Just know that in the Pistons' case, they do not own (other than their own) or owe any future picks.  The picks that are on the board are assessed a value based on my opinion of the type of player the Pistons could get with that pick, or the value they could receive in a straight up trade involving that pick.  If this were the 2012-13 season, draft pick values would be greatly reduced.  A top-5 pick in 2013 could net you Otto Porter or Anthony Bennett.  A top-5 pick in 2015 means a shot at Karl Towns, Jahlil Okafor or Emmanuel Mudiay.  Those players have much higher future NBA value than the 2013 group did. 

Last and most importantly, these are, like, my opinions or something.

Click "Read More" for the 2014-15 Pistons Asset Board

Rank
Asset
Position
Height
Weight
Age
Value
1
Andre Drummond
C
6'11
270
21
90
2
2015 1st Round Pick
High lottery
N/A
N/A
N/A
88
3
Greg Monroe
PF
6'10
255
24
67
4
Brandon Jennings
PG
6'1
170
25
64
5
Spencer Dinwiddie
G
6'6
200
21
58
6
Jodie Meeks
SG
6'5
210
27
55
7
2015 2nd Round Pick
Early 2nd
N/A
N/A
N/A
50
8
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
SG
6'5
205
21
50
9
Kyle Singler
SF
6'8
230
26
48
10
Jonas Jerebko
PF
6'10
230
27
45
11
D.J. Augustin
PG
6'0
180
27
32
12
Caron Butler
SF
6'7
220
34
27
13
Cartier Martin
G/F
6'7
220
30
25
14
Tony Mitchell
PF
6'9
235
22
16
15
Joel Anthony
C
6'9
245
32
10
16
Luigi Datome
SF
6'8
215
27
0
-
2015 Potential Cap Space*
$34,620,447
*Based on projected $66M cap


Value Scale Explained
Player values are measured on a whole number scale between 0 and 100, with 0 being the worst (no value) and 100 being the best.  This isn't a scale simply measuring Pistons players against each other.  It's measuring the value of the player to the organization against the values of other players to their organizations.  Again, these values encompass almost everything, so a player's contract absolutely comes into play.  I won't be rating every team, but hypothetically, every player is a measured on a scale from 0 (variety of awful players) to Anthony Davis.  Davis would warrant a 100 score because he's young, a legitimate top-3 talent, on a very affordable rookie contract, and potentially under control for a very long time.  He's not even a free agent until 2016, at which point he'll be restricted.  Davis having ideal value here is something I would fight to the death over, and most reasonable NBA fans would likely agree.  Everything in between Luigi Datome and Anthony Davis is subjective.  Could you argue that Datome truly does have value?  Of course; his ranking being a zero is partially a feeble attempt at humor.

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